A matter of a difference in cultures?

Over the span of our lives, it’s bound for us to be exposed to many and differing cultures from us. However it doesn’t make it a bad thing. From being exposed to other cultures and learning from them, it’s always helpful and beneficial to us mentally and also physically. As with the different perceptions and practises that other cultures would have. 

However, not everyone is so open to exploring and understanding different cultures. A shame I would say to pass on an opportunity to better learn of others and potentially individually. There are however instances where an opinion when spoken would seem horrifically insensitive. An insensitive statement will no doubt anger many. Since there are contexts that need to be understood first before coming to a conclusion. 

Culturally different

culture

That was what happened to Grant Harrold, where he unknowingly tweeted a statement that would receive a huge backlash for that. Harrold, who’s twitter handle is The Royal Butler and a former butler of the British Monarchy tweeted that rice should only ever be eaten with a knife and fork or chopsticks, and never with hands or fingers.

From the tweet itself, it’s quite expected to foresee the backlash that Harrold is about to receive. Since Twitter is not a closed community but instead houses people from all walks of life and cultures. It’s perfectly understandable that Harrold’s tweet wasn’t meant for the Asian community but exclusively to the British community. However, without further context, Harrold’s opinion has undeniably offended twitter users. 

Twitter user handle Mediocre_saying tweeted “If your etiquette teaches you to make fun of someone’s culture, then there is a need to improve your etiquette….” in response to Harrold’s tweet.

Harrold then responded “My etiquette is British etiquette training not worldwide etiquette training as stated in by bio.” He did explain his context to his tweet but it did not reduce the flack that he’s getting. It’s always better to include context before tweeting a statement. Which could potentially upset people of other races and culture.